Braces for Low Income Families, Adults and Children | Low Income Braces

Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC
 

Help Paying for Braces | Braces for Low Income Children

$5,000.  Average value of orthodontic treatment donated by Smiles Change Lives for children from qualified low income families.  “Smiles Change Lives, a national nonprofit organization that provides life-changing, essential orthodontic treatment to children from low-income families, is seeking referrals of children with severely crooked teeth and misaligned jaws who desperately need braces to improve their physical, emotional and social development.  Applicants must be ages 11-18 with documented good oral hygiene, severely crooked teeth and/or misaligned jaws and have a family income of 200 percent of federal poverty guidelines ($44,100, for example, for a family of four) or below. Applicants and their families complete an application, submit all required paperwork and agree to pay the first $250 toward the cost of treatment, which averages $5,000.” Braces for low income family. Braces for low income children.  (Joie Tyrrell, Braces for children of low-income families, Newsday, Long Island, New York, September 20, 2009, p. G02)

___________________________________________ 


"A new smile is more than just aligning teeth -
it restores confidence, self-respect,
 and the hope of a better future for children
and families who feel hopeless."
                                     —
LeAnn Smith
                               Smiles Change Lives

 ___________________________________________



$2,800.  Proposed price of braces at Colorado University Dental School for parents who can't afford to pay full fees.  “Parents who can't afford the $5,500 or so for braces for their children's teeth can get them done for about $2,800 by the students and professors in the new [University of Colorado Dental School] program.”  See CUBraces program at Lazzara Center for Oral-Facial Health, University of Colorado School of Dentistry and Health Sciences Center.  Braces for low income children?  (Bill Scanlon, “CU Development Controversy - Dental School Plan Debated,” Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, July 24, 2003, p. 16A)

$2000.  Philanthropic orthodontic treatment fee offered by Kansas City orthodontists to help low income children.  “Since 1997, the Virginia Brown Community Orthodontic Partnership has worked with Kansas City-area orthodontists to help low-income children whose oral abnormalities are severe enough that they cause embarrassment, low self-esteem and social problems.  More than 30 [Kansas City] area orthodontists [have agreed] to treat at least three new children each year for a flat fee of $2,000, instead of the more typical $4,000 to $5,000 charged for orthodontic treatment. A child's family provides the first $200 cost of the treatment, and the program pays the balance, to $2,000.”  Assistance programs for orthodontic braces.  Orthodontist help for low income.  Braces for low income families.  Cost assistance paying for braces. Affordable braces.  (Lola Butcher, Staff Writer, “KC orthodontists' program for needy goes national,” Kansas City Business Journal, Kansas City, Missouri, Friday, June 24, 2005)

$2000.  Amount per child paid by nonprofit organization Project Smile for braces for low income children.  “As a teacher in Johnson City, Tennessee, Carol Transou noticed how children with dental problems often were teased and, as a result, shied away from classroom activities that brought them attention. . . That memory pushed Transou to launch Project Smile, a local program that provides selected low-income students with dental care and braces. 

The Sunshine Lady Foundation gave an initial grant of $10,000, provided that Transou raise a matching amount locally. Johnson City dentists agreed to help with routine care and all five local orthodontists agreed to outfit students with braces at cost. The students' parents pay a nominal fee or an equivalent in-service, and Project Smile picks up the rest of the tab-about $2,000 per child.” (No author credited, “All Smiles,” NEA Today, January 1, 2003)

$1,200.  Amount per child donated by the Pacific Grove Rotary Club toward dental preparation and orthodontic work for children whose parents can't afford it.  “The Pacific Grove [California] Rotary Club is chipping in to literally bring smiles to some young people's faces.  The club's Smiles for Life program provides $1,200 per child for dental preparation and orthodontic work on children whose parents can't afford it.  General dentist Brian Lackey, a Rotary member, has teamed with orthodontist Chad Cassady to provide the service.  Rotary member Joe Shammas came up with the idea.  ‘When I was young, I had very buck teeth,’ he said. ‘I was shy about my smile and needed braces badly.’  He got them because his parents could afford them. He always remembers what confidence a good smile can bring. Shammas is matching donations by P.G. Rotary up to $500. Lackey and Cassady have agreed to work pro bono [emphasis added].  The $1,200 covers materials, Lackey said, but the cost of his work in preparing dental patients for orthodontia, and orthodontia performed by Cassady, can run up to $12,000.  The club plans to sponsor free braces [emphasis added] for two pre-teens, teenagers or other youths who can't afford them, Shammas said.” (Kevin Howe, “P.G. Rotary pays for kids' dental work,” The Monterey County Herald, Monterey, California, January 10, 2009, p. A3)

$250.  Amount paid by qualifying low income families for orthodontic treatment for children available through the Smiles Change Lives program.  “Smiles Change Lives, a national nonprofit organization that provides life-changing, essential orthodontic treatment to children from low-income families, is seeking referrals of children with severely crooked teeth and misaligned jaws who desperately need braces to improve their physical, emotional and social development. The families that turn to Smiles Change Lives (SCL) for assistance cannot afford the average cost of $5,000 to provide this life-changing treatment to their children. . . Applicants and their families complete an application, submit all required paperwork and agree to pay the first $250 toward the cost of treatment. (www.smileschangelives.org for more information or to download an application.)" Poor. Braces for low income children. (Joie Tyrrell, "Helping pay for braces," Newsday Blogs, Long Island, New York, August 20, 2009)  

Children Without Means - The Price of Neglect

Poor self-esteem, inability to speak intelligibly or chew food properly.  “Poor self-esteem can plague these [low income children with crooked teeth] well into adulthood, she said. But youngsters whose teeth are so crooked they cannot chew their food or speak intelligibly face the greatest barriers.” (Patty Mancuso, head nurse at Gateway Unified School District quoted in Scott Mobley, Record Searchlight, “Dental services often out of reach - Many families cannot afford tooth care for their children,” Redding Record Searchlight, Redding, California, April 29, 2002, p. A1)  

 
Make a Free Website with Yola.